What is the Most Popular Chinese Dialect, Mandarin or Cantonese?

Jun 05, 2009 at 06:46 | Posted in Language 语言 | 5 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Mandarin is the most popular dialect among the Chinese speakers. It is mainly used in Mainland China, Taiwan and Singapore. These areas represent a population over 1.3 billion Chinese. Mandarin dialect is the official and standard dialect in Mainland China. Almost all TV and radio stations announce in Mandarin dialect. The China education system requires that all schoolteachers in China must teach in Mandarin. In Mainland China, Mandarin is called “putonghua”, meaning “common language”.

The Cantonese dialect is popular in Canton (Guangdong) province of China, Hong Kong and with overseas Chinese in cities such as San Francisco and New York. The Chinese population in these areas is approximately 10 million.

About these ads

5 Comments »

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

  1. hey any idea where i can learn this language?(Mandarin)…in Mumbai..?

  2. This is very interesting, You’re a very skilled blogger. I’ve joined your feed and look forward to searching for more of your wonderful post. Also, I’ve shared your website in my social networks

  3. mandarin dialect is not a right term, mandarin is not a dialect, its official language!

    • Thank you. Mandarin is the official spoken language and is one of the dialects in Han Language. Han Language is one of the Chinese official languages, but none of other official Chinese languages is officially defined as the national official spoken language except Mandarin. The spoken Han Language is categorized into four major dialect systems (语系): Mandarin (官话), Wu (吴语), Kejia (客家话), and Yue (粤语). As the study on Han Language progresses, more dialect systems are added. Each system has its own subtle divisions or deviations. Beijing accent is different from the formal Mandarin (i.e. the official spoken language), but it is still under the Mandarin dialect system. Other Chinese official languages include Tibetan, Uyghur, Mongol, and Sawcuengh. My another blog, “Is Mandarin a Chinese Word?”, explains more. — Song

  4. Buddy of mine passed me the link for this. Not bad I must say and worth the effort to take a look, so thanks and keep it up.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com. | The Pool Theme.
Entries and comments feeds.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: