Song’s Translation For Fun: FW-Moral Dilemma《我的逗乐翻译》:转发-道德困境

Jul 18, 2009 at 00:32 | Posted in Fun 逗乐, Localization 本土化, Translation 翻译 | 1 Comment
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Song’s Translation For Fun. If you have a better translation, feel free to share. 《我的逗乐翻译》。另有翻译高手,请分享您的佳作。

FW: Moral Dilemma

You are driving down the road in your car on a wild, stormy night, when you pass by a bus stop and you see three people waiting for the bus:

  1. An old lady who looks as if she is about to die.
  2. An old friend who once saved your life.
  3. The perfect partner you have been dreaming about.

Which one would you choose to offer a ride to, knowing that there could only be one passenger in your car? Think before you continue reading.

This is a moral/ethical dilemma that was once actually used as part of a job application.

You could pick up the old lady, because she is going to die, and thus you should save her first. Or you could take the old friend because he once saved your life, and this would be the perfect chance to pay him back. However, you may never be able to find your perfect mate again.

YOU WON’T BELIEVE THIS

The candidate who was hired (out of 200 applicants) had no trouble coming up with his answer. He simply answered: ‘I would give the car keys to my old friend and let him take the lady to the hospital. I would stay behind and wait for the bus with the partner of my dreams.’

Sometimes, we gain more if we are able to give up our stubborn thought limitations. Never forget to ‘Think Outside of the Box.’

转发:道德困境

(Translated by Song White 华颂翻译)

一个风雨交加的夜晚,你驾车在路上疾行。经过一个公共汽车站,你看到了3位候车人:

1)   一位仿佛即将死去的老太太。

2)  一位曾经救了你一命的老朋友。

3)  一位你梦中完美的伴侣。

你知道自己的车只能捎载一名乘客,你到底选择哪一位呢?请先想想,然后再继续往下读。

这是一个道德/伦理困境,实际上曾经被用来作为工作应聘的一部分。

你可以捎载老太太,因为她就要死了,你应该先挽救她。或者,您可以捎载那位老朋友,因为他曾经救了你的命,这是个最佳的回报机会。可是这样一来,您可能将永远地错过你梦中完美的伴侣。

你将不会相信下面这个回答

在200个申请人当中,中聘的那位回答起来毫不犹豫。他只是说:“我会把车钥匙给我的老朋友,让他带老太太去医院。我会留下来,和我的梦中伴侣一同等待公共汽车。”

有时候,如果我们能够放弃我们固定的思维格式,我们获得的将是另外一番天地。不要忘记,遇事得“跳出框框”。

Twittering in Chinese is Easier in Terms of the Message Length

Jun 27, 2009 at 03:17 | Posted in Business 商务, Language 语言, Localization 本土化, Social Media 社交网站, Translation 翻译, Twitter in Chinese | Leave a comment
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Started twittering in March 2009 on an ad-hoc basis. The first couple months I stayed with English. Over a week ago, I started the entries in Chinese. What I have found is interesting: Twittering in Chinese is much easier in terms of the message length.

First I created a Chinese message. It reads “除了学习英语,不同的中文说法也让新移民不得不多花些时间。坎城是哪个城?是法国的Cannes,在大陆则叫戛纳。雪梨不是梨,在大陆是悉尼,是澳大利亚的Sydney。保险业里claim在美国叫理賠,在大陆叫索赔;endorsement在大陆是签注,在美国叫什么呢?批單?”. It talks about how the Chinese translations differ among the Chinese people depending on which area the translation was made or who made it. The Chinese message has 132 characters in Chinese. Without trimming, it fitted right into one message in Twitter that allows only up to 140 characters per posting.

I then tried to develop the same message into English. The trouble came. I could not fit the same level of information into one Twitter message in English. I tried to fit into two, and it did not work. I ended up splitting the English into three chunks to form three Twitter messages. The total English character count is 366 for the 132-character Chinese text. The ratio is close to 3:1.

What does it mean in this social media arena? It means that the Chinese users can save as much as 75% of the effort in tweaking the intended information to fit the current Twitter. Or, of the amount of information going out from the current Twitter, with the same length of 140 characters per message, Chinese can easily contain 75% more content compared with English. Up to my knowledge, the length of some other Indo-European languages such as German is even longer than English, about a fifth to a third longer.

The character limit certainly has set English users up long ago being creative. “u” is “you”; “n” is “and”; etc. In Chinese, without any shortening, “you” is “你”, 1 character. And “and” is “和”, 1 character again. Such examples can be easily grown into a long list.

What does it mean to multi-language communicators? Language wise, nothing new here: developing messages from English into Chinese, one should expect the message to shrink; the other way around, from Chinese to English, expect the message to expand. Twittering wise, any well-designed, thought through message, when being developed into another language, expecting the count of messages will change.

By the way, the three English messages were posted on June 24, 2009 at my Twitter http://twitter.com/songwhite.

Finally, I want to thank Jerry Crippledshark Neal and Ted Silker CC/CL at LinkedIn for the feedbacks on the discussion.

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